(Credit:Royal Collection Trust)

The original marks made by the artist have now been seen for the first time in nearly 300 years, and have been hailed as “categorically” proving he did not trace the works using camera tricks. (Furness, 2017)

(Credit: Royal Collection Trust)

(Credit: Royal Collection Trust)

(Credit: Royal Collection Trust).

(Credit: Art Gallery of NSW)

Canaletto and his nephew Bernardo Bellotto began to experiment with etching in the early 1740s, an enterprise that has often been attributed to the decline in visitors to Venice and commissions following the War of Austrian Succession. Many of Canaletto's prints take their subject matter from the locks, sluice gates and summerhouses along the Brenta Canal towards Padua; others are entirely imaginary. Canaletto made just thirty-three etchings in total. (www.royalcollection.org.uk)

After the image has been etched the artist applies ink to the plate with a dauber. Too much pressure will flatten the burrs and ruin the image. Once the plate is completely covered with a thin layer, a tarlatan cloth (open-weave muslin) is used to wipe away excess ink. Once the desired amount of ink is removed, the plate is run through an etching press along with a piece of dampened paper to produce a print.(Wikipedia) This is a particularly delightful etching by Canaletto titled Le Porte Del Dolo (1735-1746).

(Credit: Art Gallery of NSW)

The Hero Image today is An imaginary view of Padua by Canaletto (Source: Art Gallery NSW*

Reference: Furness, H. Royal Collection uses infrared to prove Canaletto did not trace his drawings, Telegraph, UK. 14 Apr 2017)